Glossary(19)
Terms used as applied to Data (and some Voice) Transmission over Copper Wire
  T

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T1
FT1
T3
TCP/IP
Telcordia Techno vglogies
Throughput

 

 

 

T1 -- Digital transmission facility capable of carrying data rates of 1.544Mbps. Usually used for access/egress to provider's premises. May be broken down into 24 DS-0 channels 64kbps each. The US Telco's use T1 as the primary digital communications method - also known as DS-1.

FT1 (Fractional T1) - WAN services that use some portion of a T1 Circuit which may be divided into any combination of 24 individual 64Kbps channels known as DS-0's. See: E1

T3 Digital transmission facility capable of carrying data rates of 44.736Mbps(45Mbps). Combines 28 DS1 channels. Also known as DS-3.

TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) - The suite of protocols that defines the Internet. Originally designed for the UNIX operating system, TCP/IP software is now available for every major kind of computer operating system. Some LANs, now called INTRANET, incorporate this protocol to maintain full compatibility to the Internet. To be truly on the Internet, your computer must have TCP/IP software.

Telcordia Technologies -- Formerly BELLCORE, i.e. Bell Communications Research, was created during the divestiture of the Bell System in 1984 to serve the Bell operating companies by providing a center for technological testing and certification to compliance to appropriate specifications. Today, many telcos require any equipment they deploy is either certified by, or in compliance with Telcordia Technologies requirements.

Throughput - The amount of data transferred from one point to another in a specific amount of time.  Usually measured in BPS (Bits-per second).  Depending on the system the BPS can be stated in Kbps, Mbps or Gbps.  A common throughput calculation error is the difference between BPS and CPS (Characters-per-second).  Files sizes are normally stated in CHARACTERS, not BITS.  In most asynchronous data transfers there are 10 bits per character. (one start, one stop, 8 data bits)  i.e. in a 15K file, there are 150K bits to be transferred.

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